The Limestone Way : Hostels, bunkhouses and camping barns.

Self catering bunkhouses & hostels

The Limestone Way is a 46 mile journey through the beautiful White Peak of Staffordshire and Derbshire.

The Route begins in Rocester, Staffordshire and ends in Castleton, Derbyshire.

Taking in some of the best White Peak landscape and villages from Monyash to Matlock, Ilam to Youlgreave.

The Limestone way can be walked in around 4 days.

The Limestone Way
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  • Profile picture of Glenorchy Centre

    Glenorchy Centre

    The Glenorchy Centre is found on the edge of the Peak District National Park in the historic market town of Wirksworth. The High Peak Trail for walking, pony trekking and cycling and Black Rocks for bouldering and climbing are within a couple of miles. Nearby Cromford has Arkwright's mills, a World Heritage Site, and Cromford Canal. Suitable for self-catering groups, the accommodation is well appointed and boasts a spacious multi-purpose room with a large stage.

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  • Profile picture of Alstonefield Camping Barn

    Alstonefield Camping Barn

    Close to Dovedale, the Manifold Valley Cycle Trail, Carsington Water, AltonTowers and the Roaches Rocks (great for climbers). Ideal for quiet group get togethers, families, cyclists, walkers, D of E, Scouts, school groups and team building. This is camping in the comfort of a remote cosy barn, with log burning stove. Having no electric and no distractions it is the perfect place to switch off from the hassles of a hectic life. BYO all camping equipment.

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  • Profile picture of Pindale Farm Outdoor Centre

    Pindale Farm Outdoor Centre

    A mile from Castleton in the heart of the Peak District, Pindale Farm offers a range of accommodation. There's B&B in the farmhouse. The Barn has 6 self-catering units. The Engine House is a self-catering unit and The Powder House is a small camping barn. There is also a campsite. The ideal base for many outdoor activities. Instruction is available.

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  • Profile picture of Mount Cook Adventure Centre

    Mount Cook Adventure Centre

    This purpose-built Adventure Centre in Wirksworth, Derbyshire, offers a range of exciting outdoor activities and modern en-suite accommodation for groups big & small. Accommodation includes en-suite bedrooms, glamping pods & camping. Guests can try the 108m Rooftop Rider Zip Wire reaching speeds of 40mph. High Ropes, Archery Tag and Bush Craft also onsite. Right on the High Peak Trail, perfect for walkers & cyclists. Or try canoeing, raft-building and kayaking at Carsington Reservoir.

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  • Profile picture of Royal Oak Bunkbarn

    Royal Oak Bunkbarn

    A refurbished stone barn next to an award winning Peak District country pub, The Royal Oak Bunkbarn, is perfectly situated with direct access onto the High Peak and Tissington Trails (disused railways for easy off-road cycling). The area is also very popular with climbers and walkers with limestone gorges and stone circles to explore. The bunkbarn offers comfortable, clean bunk bed style rooms. The five separate bunk rooms are all heated and lockable. Campsite and holiday cottages also available.

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  • Profile picture of Foundry Adventure Centre

    Foundry Adventure Centre

    With the Peak Park easily accessible, the centre is an ideal location for outdoor activities and it welcomes a wide range of groups. The 2 units, Kinder & Howden can be booked together or separately. The spacious centre includes; comfy lounges with library, TV and wood burning stove, well equipped kitchens & dining areas, An extensive network of paths give access to the countryside. Adventure activities available-great for team building & courses.

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  • Profile picture of The Reckoning House

    The Reckoning House

    Renovated to a high standard including double glazing and insulation, the Reckoning House is situated 3 miles from Bakewell. It is on the edge of the Lathkill Dale National Nature Reserve, full of interesting flora and fauna as well as outstanding geological features. Horse riding, fishing, golf and cycle hire are available locally. Local walks include the Limestone Way. Facilities include: cooking area, 4 calor gas rings (gas supplied), hot water for washing up & showers, storage heaters in all rooms.

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  • Profile picture of Bushey Heath Farm

    Bushey Heath Farm

    Bushey Heath Farm is a family run smallholding in the heart of the Peak District offering summer campsite and bunkbarns for groups of up to 28 in three self contained units. The farm has been developed with ground source heating, a wind turbine, and rainwater harvesting, so visitors can experience practical sustainable ideas. Sleeping bags/duvets/sheet required.

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With her walking shoes in her hands and her toes relishing the cool softness of the grass, my daughter walked the last few yards to the doors of Ilam hostel. After dinner she sighed, “can I go to bed now?” and drifted off.  It had been lovely to walk the first day of The Limestone Way with her. A lively and inquisitive companion, but the miles had exhausted her. From Rocester in Staffordshire, the path follows easy miles first along the River Dove and then, climbing out of Ellaston. Snacking on the wild blackberries thick on the bushes, our breath was taken as we crested the ridge with stunning views on both sides. We nestled in the buttress roots of an ancient tree and ate our lunch in peaceful seclusion. It was only when we greeted an energetic walker coming the other way that we realised that we hadn’t seen a soul since pretty much the start. An impatience to move on picked us up.

Dropping down towards, and then crossing the A52 we passed into Derbyshire. We paused and quietly enjoyed the company of a small owl who seemed in no hurry to leave its perch right beside the track. We left the Limestone Way at the intriguing Coldwell Bridge, which seemed too grand and ornate to be merely the farm track bridge it is today. We wondered at its history.

It’s a short detour to Ilam from there, but that’s where our accommodation was. With my daughter safely in bed, I enjoyed the handover from swifts to bats as I sat and breathed in the wonderful, wonderful evening view.

Day 2 finds me walking alone. I picked the path up again at Thorpe and walked overland through the imposing old gates to Tissington Hall, and along The Avenue, a mature tree lined lane. Tissington village was lovely. Limestone cottages and a slightly self conscious attention to period detail. The Limestone Way crosses the cycle and footpath of The Tissington trail and drops steeply down and back up above Bletch Brook. As a drizzle fell, I gladly sheltered on a wizened stile and caught my breath.

I had chosen the Limestone Way as I’d crossed, and indeed followed, parts of it many times as I explored the hills around my home town of Matlock. I was in the process of rebuilding my strength and fitness after a bout of illness. The reasonable mile count and the relatively gentle hills of The Limestone Way seemed like the ideal next challenge.

Although some of the next stretch was road walking up a long slow hill, I was rewarded with a lunch break perched on a high limestone pavement. Away to the south I could see Carsington Water and the smooth grace of its wind farm. I counted five buzzards patrolling their various territories.

The descent from above Grangemill isn’t great, with the industrialised lanes and noise of the quarries, but at least it reflects the true nature of limestone country. I was grateful by now not to have to traverse the steep gorge of The Via Gellia. Instead the path takes a gentle climb up through the farms of Ible and then to Bonsall in its warm and peaceful valley.

On Day three I am in very familiar territory, crossing the moors above Bonsall. The rutted ground and pits of the old mine workings were thick with gorgeous wildflowers. My wife would know their names. Again, I considered the simple joy of a clear head and the steady pace of solitude had to be balanced against the lost opportunities to share sights like this.

Suddenly, the path emerged on the shoulder of the valley and skirts the pretty villages of Winster and Elton. It dove down a wooded lane before leading up once again towards the twin towers of Robin Hood’s Stride. A glorious tor of rock. when I have been here before, I’ve been with family, climbing and laughing and exploring its wrinkles. This time I am alone. Resting against the sun warmed rocks, a nap overtook me.

Some miles later, having skirted the woods of Harthill, I enter the edge of Youlgreave. It is a beautiful village with good pubs and small shops keeping the community vibrant. Here the River Bradford is dammed into a series of fish pools for The estate of Haddon Hall. I take off my boots and wade upstream for about a half mile. Too soon I have to climb out of the shaded valley and up onto the moor again. I held out hope that the signposted picnic area hard at the top of the climb might hold an itinerant ice cream van, sadly not.

The path snips the end off Lathkill Dale, giving me only a brief taste of it’s stark, arid beauty, before leading me to Monyash.

The early part of day 4 takes me along roads and lanes, and although they are quiet, it is not as easy on the feet as a grassed footpath. Despite a quick dive down into Miller’s Dale, the momentum is definitely uphill. Over the past four days, with all its climbs and drops, the trend has been to rise. Over day 4 this trend becomes very clear indeed. The thin soil and limestone outcrops are more pronounced here and despite the clear skies, the air is cooler. As I cross the moors above Peak Forest, I am, for the first time since I began, cold.

The final destination, the northern end of The Limestone Way, is at Castleton. You begin the descent slowly enough, but soon you are scrambling over an uneven descent of broken dry stream bed rocks. Down the crack of a gorge which slowly widens to show that you are above the precipitous cliffs of Peveril Castle. Down, down. Quickly, over just a mile or so, all the hard won miles and feet of altitude drop away. I passed day walkers and picnickers, carrying plastic bags of goodies, who have climbed up from the town. I found myself resenting their presence a bit. Soon I was under the shadow of the castle and then before I knew it I was at the foot of the long drop down, my legs readjusting to level ground. Castleton. I had completed the

Limestone Way. I was surprised that there were people, cars, bustle.

I stood alone under my rucksack, alone among these people who hadn’t shared the distance and the effort with me. I felt stronger and welled than I had for a long time.