Offa’s Dyke: Accommodation in Hostels and Bunkhouses

Self catering bunkhouses & hostels
accommodarion on offas dyke

The Offa’s Dyke path runs the length of the border between England and Wales from Sedbury Cliffs near Chepstow in the south to Prestayn in the North. In parts the route follows the Dyke or embankment built by the 9th Century King of Mercia; Offa, to protect his kingdom from those on the welsh side of the border. Many people walk it from South to North, starting at Sedbury Cliffs on the River Severn close to Chepstow, the route then heads north following the River Wye for a time to Monmouth, it then takes in the peaceful farmlands of Monmouthshire and the Black Mountains to Hay on Wye. Then on through Powys and the Herefordshire border to Kington and Knighton and Montgomery. The path then heads through the Wales and Shropshire boarders to Llangollen and then on the Clywdian Range to the coast at Prestatyn. Independent Hostel accommodation can be combined with YHA and B&Bs to provide overnight accommodation along the route.

Accommodation on Offa's Dyke
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  • Profile picture of Springhill Farm Bunkhouse

    Springhill Farm Bunkhouse

    Part of a Welsh hill farm on the Wales/Shropshire border at 1475ft above sea level, with beautiful views over the Ceiriog Valley and Berwyn Mountains. Great for walking, riding, cycling, team building, meetings, or just to relax. There is a heated games and lecture room. The bunkhouse has under-floor heating, entrance hall with w/c and large kitchen plus lounge and dining room. The patio and lawn have a BBQ and hot tub. Horse riding and archery are available on site. Horses and pets welcome on request.

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  • Profile picture of The Wain House

    The Wain House

    This old stone barn continues the tradition of 900 years when Llanthony Priory next door provided accommodation. Surrounded by the Black Mountains in the Brecon Beacons National Park, it is your ideal base for all mountain activities. There is a fully equipped kitchen, hot showers, heating throughout and a wood burning stove. Small or large groups are welcome with sole use and a minimum charge. Two pubs nearby offer real ale and bar food.

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  • Profile picture of Dunfield House

    Dunfield House

    In rural Herefordshire, close to the Welsh border, Dunfield House provides accommodation for groups of up to 95 with sole use of the house, stables, parkland and swimming pool. From November to March the house and stables can also be hired individually by smaller groups. The house provides fully catered accommodation and the stables have a self-catering kitchen. A great choice for school, youth, music or church groups, training courses and family get-togethers.

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  • Profile picture of Ye Old Ferrie Inn Bunkhouse

    Ye Old Ferrie Inn Bunkhouse

    This beautiful riverside pub has been standing on the banks of the River Wye since the 15th century. With charming traditional features, warming open fires and stunning views across the valley, Ye Old Ferrie Inn is the ideal base for your exploration of the Wye Valley. Ye Old Ferrie Inn Bunkhouse, adjoining the inn, is the perfect place for you to hang up your rucksack, kick off your walking boots and relax. Popular with canoeists, walkers and climbers. If you don't fancy self-catering there is B&B in the Inn.

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  • Profile picture of Green Man Backpackers Chepstow

    Green Man Backpackers Chepstow

    Situated in the heart of Chepstow, Green Man Backpackers offers inspired accommodation in a Grade 2 historic building. Chepstow is the starting/finishing point for Offa's Dyke path, the Wales Coast Path, Gloucester Way, the Wye Valley Walk, The Forest of Dean, and the Wye Valley AONB. Just 1 mile from Land's End/John O'Groats route.

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  • Profile picture of Dragons Back

    Dragons Back

    The Dragons Back (formerly The Castle Inn) is a pub with B&B, camping & bunkrooms in the Brecon Beacons National Park. The bunkrooms are fully carpeted and centrally heated with en suite wet rooms, self-catering, drying facilities and secure storage. Stag/hens welcome. Dogs £5 pn in the bunkhouse. Meals in the pub. Glamping is available in our Shepherds hut and the Tardis !

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  • Profile picture of Llangollen Hostel

    Llangollen Hostel

    Llangollen Hostel, in the Dee Valley is your perfect location for walking, cycling, canoeing and white water rafting. Families will love visiting the steam railway, horse drawn canal boats and Pontcysyllte Aqueduct - a World Heritage Site. The town offers a great choice of restaurants/pubs and is home to a fringe music and arts festival and the International Eisteddfod. Llandegla, Chester, Wrexham and Offa's Dyke Path are all nearby. A warm welcome awaits!

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Accommodation on Offa’s Dyke Long distance walk

The Offa’s Dyke path runs the length of the border between England and Wales from Sedbury Cliffs near Chepstow in the south to Prestayn in the North. In parts the route follows the Dyke or embankment built by the 9th Century King of Mercia; Offa, to protect his kingdom from those on the welsh side of the border. Offa’s Dyke long distance trail is 177 miles long and usually takes around 2 weeks to walk. 

The route is mostly walked from South to North with walkers  starting at Sedbury Cliffs on the River Severn close to Chepstow, The Green Man Backpackers in Chepstow is a great place to spend the night before you head off.  The route then heads north following the River Wye for a time to Monmouth, here walkers can stay at Ye Olde Ferry Inn which is about 5km from the trail.  The path then takes in the peaceful farmlands of Monmouthshire and the Black Mountains to Hay on Wye.  Walkers often break up this high hilly section by staying a Lanthony and The Wain House just 1km from the path is a great place to do this.  The next section is less well provided for by Independent Hostels but the Long Distance Walkers Association and the National Trials websites have details of options of YHA and B&B hostels.

Offas Dyke path winds it’s way through Powys and the Herefordshire border to the market towns of Kington and Knighton, and the historic town of Montgomery. The path then heads through the Wales and Shropshire boarders to the town of Trevor near Llangollen using both the Montgomery and Llangollen canals at points on the walk and crossing the historic Pontcysyllte Aqueduct.  Walkers can make a short detour into Llangollen and stay at the welcoming Llangollen Hostel before heading on to the next section of the Offa’s Dyke walk.  After Llangollen the walk enters the Clywdian Range and most of the rest of the walk is on a heather clad ridge with fantastic views of both sides of the border until the decent to the coast at Prestatyn.

Offa’s Dyke connects with the Wales Coast Path creating a circular route around the edge of Wales.