Offa’s Dyke: Accommodation in Hostels and Bunkhouses

Self catering bunkhouses & hostels
accommodarion on offas dyke

The Offa’s Dyke path runs the length of the border between England and Wales from Sedbury Cliffs near Chepstow in the south to Prestayn in the North. In parts the route follows the Dyke or embankment built by the 9th Century King of Mercia; Offa, to protect his kingdom from those on the welsh side of the border. Many people walk it from South to North, starting at Sedbury Cliffs on the River Severn close to Chepstow, the route then heads north following the River Wye for a time to Monmouth, it then takes in the peaceful farmlands of Monmouthshire and the Black Mountains to Hay on Wye. Then on through Powys and the Herefordshire border to Kington and Knighton and Montgomery. The path then heads through the Wales and Shropshire boarders to Llangollen and then on the Clywdian Range to the coast at Prestatyn. Independent Hostel accommodation can be combined with YHA and B&Bs to provide overnight accommodation along the route.

Accommodation on Offa's Dyke
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Accommodation on Offas Dyke Long distance walk

The Offa’s Dyke path runs the length of the border between England and Wales from Sedbury Cliffs near Chepstow in the south to Prestayn in the North. In parts the route follows the Dyke or embankment built by the 9th Century King of Mercia; Offa, to protect his kingdom from those on the welsh side of the border. Offa’s Dyke long distance trail is 177 miles long and usually takes around 2 weeks to walk. 

The route is mostly walked from South to North with walkers  starting at Sedbury Cliffs on the River Severn close to Chepstow, The Green Man Backpackers in Chepstow is a great place to spend the night before you head off.  The route then heads north following the River Wye for a time to Monmouth, here walkers can stay at Ye Olde Ferry Inn which is about 5km from the trail.  The path then takes in the peaceful farmlands of Monmouthshire and the Black Mountains to Hay on Wye.  Walkers often break up this high hilly section by staying a Lanthony and The Wain House just 1km from the path is a great place to do this.  The next section is less well provided for by Independent Hostels but the Long Distance Walkers Association and the National Trials websites have details of options of YHA and B&B hostels.

Offas Dyke path winds it’s way through Powys and the Herefordshire border to the market towns of Kington and Knighton, and the historic town of Montgomery. The path then heads through the Wales and Shropshire boarders to the town of Trevor near Llangollen using both the Montgomery and Llangollen canals at points on the walk and crossing the historic Pontcysyllte Aqueduct.  Walkers can make a short detour into Llangollen and stay at the welcoming Llangollen Hostel before heading on to the next section of the Offa’s Dyke walk.  After Llangollen the walk enters the Clywdian Range and most of the rest of the walk is on a heather clad ridge with fantastic views of both sides of the border until the decent to the coast at Prestatyn.